Nutrition Facts

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Nutrition Facts

  • According to the USDA’s 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, it was recommended seafood intake should be increased by replacing some meat or poultry with seafood:
    • Mean intake of seafood in the United States is approximately 3 1/2 ounces per week, and increased intake is recommended. Seafood contributes a range of nutrients, notably the omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Moderate evidence shows that consumption of about 8 ounces per week of a variety of seafood, which provide an average consumption of 250 mg per day of EPA and DHA, is associated with reduced cardiac deaths among individuals with and without pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Thus, this recommendation contributes to the prevention of heart disease. The recommendation is to consume seafood for the total package of benefits that seafood provides, including its EPA and DHA content.
    • In addition to the health benefits for the general public, the nutritional value of seafood is of particular importance during fetal growth and development, as well as in early infancy and childhood. Moderate evidence indicates that intake of omega-3 fatty acids, in particular DHA, from at least 8 ounces of seafood per week for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding is associated with improved infant health outcomes, such as visual and cognitive development.
      Source: United States Department of Agriculture – http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DietaryGuidelines.htm 
  • Shrimp are made almost entirely of protein and water.
    Source: Healwithfood.org – http://www.healwithfood.org/health-benefits/eating-shrimp.php
  • Shrimp are an excellent source of selenium. Selenium is an essential trace mineral in the human body. This nutrient is an important part of antioxidant enzymes that protect cells against the effects of free radicals that are produced during normal oxygen metabolism. The body has developed defenses such as antioxidants to control levels of free radicals because they can damage cells and contribute to the development of some chronic diseases. Selenium is also essential for normal functioning of the immune system and thyroid gland. Mounting evidence suggests a link between selenium intake and reduced risk of cancer.
    Source: EATShrimp.com – http://www.eatshrimp.com/health-nutrition/nutritional-facts/nutritional-facts
  • Shrimp are considered a true beauty food because it contains astaxanthin, a carotenoid that gives them their pink color and that can act as a potent antioxidant and protect the skin from premature aging. Also the omega-3 fatty acids in shrimp provide antioxidant protection. The zinc shrimp boast plays an important role in the production of new cells (including hair cells and skin cells). It also helps maintain the oil-secreting glands on the scalp that keep hair shiny. In addition, shrimp are a good source of copper, which can help prevent hair loss, contribute to hair thickness, and intensify hair color.
    Source: Healwithfood.org – http://www.healwithfood.org/health-benefits/eating-shrimp.php
  • Shrimp can be part of a heart smart diet as long as it is enjoyed in moderation, eaten boiled, baked or grilled.
    Source: HealthLine – http://www.healthline.com/health-blogs/heart-smart-living/shrimp-cholesterol-and-heart-health 
  • Given shrimp contain no carbohydrates, their Glycemic Index rating is 0.
    Source: Healwithfood.org – http://www.healwithfood.org/health-benefits/eating-shrimp.php
  • Eating shrimp provides weight loss benefits. Loaded with protein, vitamin D, vitamin B3, and zinc, shrimp are an excellent, carbohydrate-free food for anyone determined to shed off pounds. Zinc supplementation of zinc deficient subjects has been shown to increase the levels of circulating leptin. Leptin is a hormone that plays a key role in regulating the body’s energy expenditure, fat storage, and appetite. Insufficient leptin levels are believed to be the primary cause of food cravings, overeating, and obsession with food. The iodine in shrimp is good for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland, which controls the basal metabolic rate, or the rate at which the body consumes energy at rest. Iodine deficiency can result in sluggish thyroid activity, which in turn can lead to weight gain or hinder weight loss.
    Source: Healwithfood.org – http://www.healwithfood.org/health-benefits/eating-shrimp.php
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